Sindarin Lessons Sindarin Phrases Pronunciation Mutation charts etc.ath endings Base 10 to Base 12 Greetings & small talk. 101 Sindarin Phrases (to put on your website) By Fiona J. Of Realelvish.net. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license.

In our second lesson, Lamaeron talks about what to say when you first meet an elf and how to ask them questions. Official Website: http://malhalla.conlang.or. Sindarin is one of the fictional languages devised by J. Tolkien for use in his fantasy stories set in Arda, primarily in Middle-earth.Sindarin is one of the many languages spoken by the Elves, called the Eledhrim ɛˈlɛðrɪm or Edhellim ɛˈðɛlːɪm in Sindarin. The word Sindarin is itself a Quenya form, as the Sindar, or 'Grey Elves' themselves did not have a name for it. I am aware that I didn't actually pronounce 'pronunciation' correctly. Derp.In this lesson you will learn the correct way to pronounce words in sindarin.

miriel361 wrote:
Okay so how would I respond to a question like, 'Would you like something to drink'
Anirach sog?
??
I pass this on to the experts.

I'm not sure I'm an expert, but sometimes I like to dream I am .
I'm assuming that 'Anírach sog' means 'would you wish a drink?'
If that's the case, then sog mutates to hog because it's a direct object pronoun and D.O. pronouns suffer soft mutation. So the translation would be:
'Anírach hog?'
Now, if you want something like 'Would you wish to drink?' Then you would need to translate it as 'would you wish drinking?' since Sindarin tends to use the gerund form rather than the infinitive. So the translation would be:
'Anírach sogad?'
Now the trick is deciding ... would the gerund mutate? My guess is yes, so you would end up with:
'Anírach hogad?'
Onto the next question ... I agree with SpaceWeavil, I think a reaffirmation would work as a 'yes-answer'. So, I would respond with 'aníran.' Answering back with 'aníran' or even a 'le hannon' would be appropiate.
(Trivia fact: 'hannon le' is used in the movies, but apparently is incorrect. The prounoun 'le' comes from Quenya and it only appears in the texts preceeding the verb. Personally, I like better how 'hannon le' flows ... but then I'm so picky about grammar that once I learned 'hannon le' was 'ify' grammatically speaking, I stopped using it).
Hope this helped ... it's a nice break from rambling about Spanish grammar to my students !

_________________
~ boe an phân pedi ‘lam dadui ~
~ everyone should speak a second language ~

The voice actors were Fiona Jallings (female voice that struggles with R-rolling) and Adam Elliott (male voice brought in to roll R’s).

General Dialect

Sindarin has three different writing systems, so the sounds are written with all three.

  1. Cirth: which was used by the Sindarin elves, including those in Doriath and later the Woodelves. This is the writing system that Legolas and Thranduil would be familiar with.
  2. Tengwar, the Mode of Beleriand: which was used by the Noldorin Exiles in Beleriand and later on Eregion. This is the writing system that Elrond and his family would be familiar with.
  3. Tengwar, the Classical Mode: which was used by the Númenóreans and later the Gondorians. This is the writing system that Boromir and Faramir would have been familiar with.

Vowels

cIv]=]F`C=~C (A/Á/Â) Pronounce them /ɑ/, like the A is in the word “father”.

Recording features the words: Anc, Balch, Cân, Dâth, Fast, Glass, Hâdh, Iâ

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/A.wav

bIñl=lF`V=~V (E/É/Ê) Pronounce them /ɛ/, like the E of “better”.

Recording features the words: Êg, Le, Melch, Nêl, Pend, Rest, Sen, Têw

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/E.wav

lI;`=`V`B=~B (I/Í/Î) Pronounce them /i/, as in the word “machine”. The Sindarin I also acts like the consonant Y before vowels.

Recording features the words: Inc, Brith, Cîl, Dîr, Find, Glî, Hîth, Lhîw

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/I.wav

ðIòy=yF`N=~N (O/Ó/Ô) Pronounce them /ɔ/ as in the word “thought.”

Recording features the words: Ôl, Lô, Môr, Norn, Post, Ross, Sôg, Thôn

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/O.wav

SIk.=.F`M=~M (U/Ú/Û) Pronounce them /u/ as in “brute”, in the front of your mouth. Make your lips in the shape of a kiss.

Recording features the words: Û, Tûr, Brûn, Cund, Drû, Gurth, Hûb, Iûl

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/U.wav

øIùIýi=iF`×=~× (Y/Ý/Y) Pronounce them /y/ like the French U, as in “lune”. To make this sound, make your mouth in the shape of the Sindarin (I). Then, shape your lips the same way you shape “U” in Sindarin. Or, take the easy road out and use the Gondorian pronunciation, and say it “i” like the Sindarin “I” above.

Recording features the words: Ylf, Cyll, Ym, Gyrth, Lyg, Myl, Yr, Ryn

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Y.wav

*Accents on vowels denote extra length on the vowels. Hold the vowels longer. In music this is shown with a tenuto (-) over the note. The circumflex accent (^) is held longer than an acute accent (´). In IPA, the Sindarin circumflex accent would be shown with (ː) and the Sindarin acute accent would be shown with (ˑ). The second one there is not an apostrophe (‘).

Diphthongs

íhD (AI) Pronounce this /ɑj/, as in the word “twine”.

Recording features the words: Aith, Bain, Cai, Fair, Gail, Haim, Iaich, Lain

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/AI.wav

&]llD (AE) Pronounce this /ɑɛ/, almost exactly the same at (AI) above, just glide into an (E), not an (I).

Recording features the words: Aes, Caew, Laeg, Mael, Naeth, Paen, Raew, Saer, Taeg

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/AE.wav

*yD (AU) Pronounce this /ɑu/, as in the word “ouch”.

Recording features the words: Caul, Daug, Faun, Gaur, Haust, Iaun, Naug, Paur, Raun

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/AU.wav

*yD (AW) Pronounce this /ɑw/, as in the word “owl”.

Recording features the words: Raw, Rhaw, Saw, Taw, Baw, Daw, Gaw, Iaw, Maw

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/AW.wav

JhF (EI) Pronounce this /ej/, as in “ray“.

Recording features the words: Eilph, Ceir, Fein, Feir, Gweith, Heir, Meil, Neil

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/EI.wav

õhllH (OE) Pronounce this /ɔɛ/, as in the word “boy“.

Recording features the words: Oeth, Boe, Coen, Doeg, Foen, Hoest, Loeg

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/OE.wavThat

LhJ (UI) Pronounce this /uj/, as in the word “gooey“.

Recording features the words: Uil, Muin, Nuin, Puig, Ruin, Sui, Tuiw, Brui

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/UI.wav

Consonants

eaz (C), Rsx (G), %88=i (S) These each are pronounced only one way, but since they are all sounds that we have in English, there won’t be recording for these. Pronounce them always /k/, /g/, and /s/, as in the words “cat”, “give”, “sell”.

z`h=l (I) Before a vowel at the beginning of a word, (I) is pronounced /j/ and used as a consonant, as the Y in the word “yellow”. If there is an accent on the (I) you always pronounce it /i/, as you do for the vowel. If there is a consonant before it, (I) before another vowel doesn’t make it a Y consonant, it behaves like the vowel (I).

Recording features the words: Iaew, Iâl, Iaun, Iest, Io, Iôl, Iuith, Iûl

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/I2.wav

3ee (F) Pronounce it like the F in “fun” unless it’s at the end of a word. At the end of word, say it as a /v/ as in the word “slave”. At the end of a word, it’s spelled differently as well: 4rr

Recording features the words: Falf, Parf, Lâf, Gorf, Nef

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/F.wav

f99 (-H, At the end of a word) It will be put at the beginning of the following word, but only if that words starts with a vowel. H’s at the ends of words are otherwise silent.

ajj (L) pronounce it as a /l/, as in the word “late”. When it comes between E or I and a consonant, or at the end of a word after E or I, it is pronounced /ʎ/, with the middle or tip of the tongue touching the palate behind the ridge behind the teeth.

Recording features the words: Lest, Pêl, Edhellen, Elbereth, Talan, Mallen, Alphirin

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/L.wav

amm (LH) Pronounce it /l̥/, a voiceless L. That means, you shape your mouth the same way that you would when making the L sound, but only air will come out, and it will sound a little like an H. This sound never appears within a word. If you see LH inside a word rather than as the first two letters in a word, then it is two separate sounds, L and H.

Recording features the words: Lhaew, Lhain, Lhê, Lhind, Lhing, Lhîw, Lhoss

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/LH.wav

@77 (R) Pronounce it as an /r/; roll it as we sometimes do in the word “growl” If you can’t roll an R, like me, make an H sound with your throat closed a little. It should make a rolled A sound. It’ll be a little like gargling water.

Recording features the words: Rem, Grond, Parf, Môr

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/R.wav

@uu (RH) Pronounce it /r̊/, a voiceless R. That means, you shape your mouth the same way that you would when making the rolled R sound, but only air will come out, like a trilled H. This sound never appears within a word. If you see RH inside a word rather than as the first two letters in a word, then it is two separate sounds, R and H.

Recording features the words: Rhîw, Rhass, Rhosc, Rhûn

Thathttps://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/RH.wav

3ee (PH) Pronounce it always /f/, as in the word “phone”.

tdc (CH) Pronounce it /x/, as in the name “Bach“. Say it in the back of your mouth, it should feel a little as though you are hocking a loogy, or gargling without anything in your mouth.

Recording features the words: Châdh, Bach, Roch, Chaew, Chwest, Melch, Orch

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/CH.wav

033 (TH) Pronounce it /θ/, like the TH in the word “nothing”.

Recording features the words: Thîr, Hîth, Thêl, Carth

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/TH.wav

!44 (DH) Pronounce it /ð/, like the TH in the words “the” and “blithe“.

Recording features the words: Adh, Dhaw, Dhant, Edhel, Ídhra, Galadhon

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/DH.wav

5oo (HW) Pronounce it /ʍ/, as in the word “white”. It’s a really airy W. This sound never appears within a word. If you see HW inside a word rather than as the first two letters in a word, then it is two separate sounds, H and W.

Recording features the words: Hwand, Hwest, Hwind, Hwá

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/HW.wav

hgb (NG/Ñ) Pronounce these /ŋ/, as in the word “sing“. N’s before C’s are pronounced the same way.

Recording features the words: Anc, Ñail, Ñaur, Lanc, Ang, Lang, Inc, Ñôl

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/NG.wav

DsPxP (NG/ÑG) Pronounce them /ŋg/. When (NG) is between two vowels, pronounce it with both the N and the G, like in the word “finger”.

Recording features the words: i ñgelydh, Fangorn, añ gail, i ñgoer, añ gas, Tangada

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/NG2.wavThat

The rest of the letters are pronounced as we pronounce them in English.

Where the stress falls

Stress is when a syllable is said louder and higher pitched than other syllables in a word. Primary stress (the loudest, highest syllable) is notated by having a (ˈ) before the syllable, and secondary stress (not as high and loud as the primary stress, but higher and louder than the rest of the syllables) is marked with a (ˌ) before the syllable.

Syllables are determined by vowel-sounds. There is one vowel or diphthong per a syllable. When looking for where to place stress, look only at the last three syllables.

  • If the word is 1, 2, or 3 syllables long then the first syllable gets the stress.
  • If it is longer than 3 syllables, the 3rd syllable from the end gets the stress.
  • If the 2nd to last syllable in a word has one of these special markers, it gets the stress instead of the 3rd syllable from the end.
    1. Accents (Acute and Circumflex)
    2. Diphthongs (AE, AI, AU, AW, EI, OE, and UI)
    3. Multiple Consonants (This only counts if they come at the end of the syllable. They can be two of the same letter side by side. They could also be several different consonants next to each other. Remember that CH, DH, and TH only count as one consonant.)
1pronounsthat that or that is sindarin lessons learned

Dialects

1pronounsthat That Or That Is Sindarin Lessons Learned

We’ve covered above the basic sounds of Sindarin, now we’ll learn how the dialects differentiate from eachother in ways that won’t show up in the spellings of the words.

Doriathren Sindarin

With the voice of Roandil (the male voice) and Fiona (the woman who can’t roll R’s to save her life).

This dialect was spoken by the Sindar in Beleriand before Morgoth and the Noldor arrived. Later it was preserved in Doriath, no doubt do to Melian’s Girdle which preserved and protected everything within. This dialect covers a long period of time, and has no influences from Quenya.

In Pre-invasion Sindarin; there are five sounds that we need to pay attention to. M, LTH, MPH, NTH, and NCH/ÑCH. These are pretty self explanatory. You can use the general Sindarin pronunciation section above to figure out the pronunciation of these.

At the moment Melian’s Girdle went up, Sindarin was in a moment of massive change. The dialects outside of Doriath have these sound turn into V, LL, MM, NN, and NG, respectively.

6 (M → MH) Pronounce this /ṽ/ as a nasalized V. Make a V in your mouth, but push the air through your nose like when you’re making an M. If there is a U before the MH, it also ends up nasalized.

Recording features the words: Lûmh, Samho, Mhen, Mheren, Mhae, Pedimh

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/MH_labiodental_nasal.mp3

a0 (LTH) Pronounced /l̥l̥/ the same as the LH above, but longer, ending the previous syllable and starting the next.

Recording features the words: Malthorn, Oltho, Toltha, Haltha, Doltha

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/LTH.mp3

63 (MPH) Pronounced /m̥;m̥/, a long voiceless M. To make this sound, whisper an M, like when you say “mhm.”

Recording features the words: Limphida, Tampha, Nimphida, Hampha, Blamphen

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/MPH.mp3

1pronounsthat That Or That Is Sindarin Lessons In The Bible

,0 (NTH) Pronounced /n̥n̥/, a long, voiceless N. To make this sound, whisper an N.

Recording features the words: Abonthen, Dantha, Cinthog, Antha, Fantha

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/NTH.mp3

ht (NCH) Pronounced /ŋ̊ŋ̊/, a long, voiceless Ñ. To make this sound, whisper an Ñ.

Recording features the words: Danchen, Bancha, Tanchada, Sonchen

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/NCH.mp3

Woodelven Sindarin

This dialect was spoken by the Non-Sindarin Woodelves in Lothlórien and Mirkwood. It’s heavily influenced by their native language, Nandorin, and the dialect of Sindarin that they came in contact with, the Southern dialect of Beleriand. I’ve reflected their pronunciation differences in the names like Tolkien did, but not in the phrases provided on the website.

& (AE) Pronounce this like the Sindarin (E) above. This is why a&Rðac% (Legolas) is pronounced and spelled in the Latin alphabet with an E instead of AE.

1pronounsthat That Or That Is Sindarin Lessons Grammar

Gondorian Sindarin

This dialect was spoken in Gondor as a second language by Gondorian nobility. It’s heavily affected by their native language, Westron, and therefore it lacks certain sounds that their own language does. I’ve reflected their pronunciation differences in the names like Tolkien did, but not in the phrases provided on the website.

1pronounsthat That Or That Is Sindarin Lessons Written

`×=~×(Y/Ý/Ŷ) Pronounce them /i/ like the Sindarin “I” above.

c (CH) Pronounce it like an (H) when coming before a vowel, thus the word “Rohan” instead of “Rochan”. Everywhere else, the (CH) becomes (C), thus “Orcrist” instead of “Orchrist”.

Recording features the words: Châdh (Hâdh), Bach (Bac), Roch (Roc), Chaew (Haew), Chwest (Cwest), Melch (Melc), Orch (Orc)

https://realelvish.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/CH2.wav

Note: I am using Northwestern American English, which anyone can tell you, is a little different from the rest of the world’s English. I tried to compromise by using IPA, but if some of the English examples still don’t make sense, let me know, and I’ll try to find a better word.

Sources:

Is?sindarin

The Lord of the Rings (The Return of the King) – Appendix E

The Unfinished Tales – Cirion and Eorl – Note 49

The Silmarillion – Note on Pronunciation

Parma Eldalamberon #17: Words, Phrases and Passages in The Lord of the Rings – pages 131-134

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